Live casinos that are available for residents of TAIWAN, PROVINCE OF CHINA

There are currently no casinos in Taiwan. Although gambling is illegal, an amendment was passed in 2009 to allow casino resorts to be built on offshore islands. The first offshore casino is expected to be approved shortly.

Live Dealer Casinos that offer live dealer games licensed from TAIWAN, PROVINCE OF CHINA
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Lucky Live Casino
Lucky Live Casino
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Celtic Casino
Celtic Casino
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Dublin Bet
Dublin Bet
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Fairway Casino
Fairway Casino
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1 Live Casino
1 Live Casino
50% Cash Back up to €100
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Smart Live Casino
Smart Live Casino
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Castle Casino
Castle Casino
Get £ 100 on your First Deposit!
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Paddy Power Casino
Paddy Power Casino
£/€25 New Player Bonus
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Globet Casino
Globet Casino
Get 100% up to €500 on your first deposit.
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Taiwan, officially the Republic of China (not to be confused with the People's Republic of China) is an East Asian state comprising the island of Taiwan (previously called 'Formosa' and lying around 110 miles/180 kilometers off China's southeastern coast) and other minor islands. Taiwan's neighbors are Japan to the east and northeast, and China (the People's Republic of China) to the west. The East China Sea lies to the north of Taiwan, the Luzon Strait to its south, the Philippine Sea to its east, and the South China Sea to its southwest. Taiwan covers a total area of almost 14 000 square miles (just over 36,000 sq. km.) and has an estimated population of 23.25 million people, making it the world's 17th most densely populated country. The capital of Taiwan is Taipei, which is also the country's economic and cultural center. 

 

Taiwan, which consists predominantly of rugged mountain ranges and rolling plains, has a marine tropical climate, with all areas of the island experiencing hot, humid summers, and some areas of the island experiencing monsoons and extended periods of rain during the first quarter of the year and typhoons between July and October.

 

The official language of Taiwan is Mandarin (the primary language taught in schools and used in media and broadcasting), while Taiwanese, Hakka and various indigenous Formosan languages are recognized regional languages. Some older generations, who grew up during the period when Taiwan was under Japanese rule, understand little or no Mandarin, and instead speak Japanese (which they were taught at school) and possibly the local Taiwanese or Hakka spoken in homes. 

 

Taiwan, the world's 39th richest economy by GDP (nominal) per capita, relies heavily on international trade, which has fuelled its rapid growth for the last four decades. Industrial goods make up the majority of exports, with principal exports including electronics, telecoms equipment, LCD flat panels, office machine parts, automatic data processing equipment, textiles, plastics, chemicals, base metals, and specialist instruments (optical, photographic, measuring, medical, etc.). Taiwan's key foreign trade partners are China, Japan, the USA, the European Union, and Hong Kong, although South Korea is now targeting the emerging economies including Brazil, Southeast Asia, Russia and the Middle East more, and moving away from the USA and Europe.

 

Taiwan's food reflects the ethnic diversity of the country as well as various geographic, economic and cultural influences. Food includes traditional 'Holo' cooking, Hakka cuisine and vegetarian foods, as well as the various cooking styles of China, such as Jiangzhe, Cantonese and Sichuan. 

The western-central area around Changhua has a variety of coastal dishes that seafood, such as oyster omelet and noodles with oysters, as well as pork-based dishes such as rice with stewed pork and meatballs (made with pork, bamboo shoots and mushrooms) served inside a dumpling. Since hunting and fishing played an important part in the lives of Taiwan's indigenous peoples, several traditional meals are based on meat and fish. The Hakka people, pioneers who sailed the seas before arriving in Taiwan, created salty, fragrant dishes that are still popular today. Hakka foods include salty, steamed and chopped chicken, steamed pork with dry mustard cabbage, stir fry with pork, squid and bean curd, and a "lucky vegetable soup" of dried mustard greens. Taiwan cuisine, like that of many of its Asian neighbors, is flavored with a variety of sauces and seasonings such as soy sauce, oyster sauce, spicy soybean sauce, fermented bean curd paste, sesame oil sauce and pickled vegetables. Typical sweet specialties include rice cake, millet cake, egg-yolk shortbread and pineapple cake. Popular beverages include 'Hakka leicha' (a pounded tea), pearl milk tea, milk shakes using exotic fruits and sugarcane juice.

 

Taiwan's culture combines several influences: traditional Chinese culture, Japanese culture and (more recently) Western values. Taiwan's National Palace Museum is of great cultural importance, and is considered one of the world's greatest collections of Chinese art and items of cultural and archaeological interest, housing over 650,000 items of Chinese bronze, jade, calligraphy, painting and porcelain. Music and dance are an important art form in Taiwan, with the music and dance of the indigenous peoples, folk dances and martial arts all forming part of the country's cultural heritage, while Western dance forms such as ballroom, street dance and aerobics have all become increasingly popular in recent years. An example of Japanese culture pervading Taiwan's cultural environment is Karaoke, which is extremely popular in Taiwan and is known locally as "KTV". Several establishments across Taiwan provide an entire evening of entertainment and food, while tour buses often have television sets installed specifically for Karaoke. Baseball is the national sport of Taiwan, while basketball and Taekwondo are also extremely popular. As well as being influenced by other cultures, Taiwan has also influenced the cultures of other countries, with its TV shows popular in other parts of Asia and critically acclaimed movies having won awards at international film festivals. Taiwan's most famous movie director is unquestionably Ang Lee, renowned for movies such as "Brokeback Mountain", "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" and "Sense and Sensibility".