Live casinos that are available for residents of PORTUGAL

Live Dealer Casinos that offer live dealer games licensed from PORTUGAL
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Globet Casino
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Portugal, a coastal nation located in Southwestern Europe, is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean to the south and west and by Spain to its north and east. Portuguese territory also includes two archipelagoes in the Atlantic Ocean: the Azores and Madeira. Portugal, which has been a democracy since 1974, covers an area of almost 36,000 square miles (92 thousand sq. km.) and has an estimated population of around 10.6 million people. 

 

Portugal is renowned for its extensive coastline that stretches for more than 580 miles (approximately 943 kilometers) in continental Portugal, as well as for its steep and rugged cliffs, sandy beaches, and towns and cities containing fine architecture of historic interest. Much of the coastline enjoys warm summers and mild winters. The north of the country (which is cooler and receives more rain than the south) is substantially mountainous, with plateaus spread through the interior of the country, while the south is characterized by plains and tourist-friendly beach resorts. Portugal also contains various rivers and lagoons (no natural lakes exist within the country), as well as national parks and forests. 

 

The country's official language is Portuguese, a Romance language derived from the Latin spoken by Pre-Roman peoples within the Iberian Peninsula over 2,000 years ago. When Portugal established its commercial and colonial empire, commencing in the early 15th century, Portuguese spread across the world, and is today still spoken as a native language on four different continents, and more specifically in countries such as Brazil (containing the most native speakers of Portuguese anywhere in the world), Angola, Mozambique, Cape Verde, and East Timor.

 

Portugal is the world's 35th richest economy by GDP (nominal) per capita. Tourism is especially important to the Portuguese economy, although the country has seen increasing competition from Eastern Europe, and as a result is now focusing on more niche forms of tourism (such as health and nature-based tourism). During the last two decades, Portugal has focused on increasing its exports, attracting private investments and developing its high-tech sector, with business services overtaking its more traditional sectors such as textiles, apparel and footwear, wood products, cork and beverages. Agriculture, fishing and minerals (especially copper) also make a significant contribution to Portugal's economy. Principal Portuguese exports remain, however, apparel and footwear, machinery, chemicals, cork (Portugal is the world's leading exporter), products and hides. Portugal is also the world's eighth largest producer of wine.

 

The cuisine of Portugal reflects the legacy of its rich history, explorers and overseas colonies. The Romans introduced wheat, onions, garlic, grapes and olives, while the Moors later planted rice and almond trees, as well as lemon and orange groves, and introduced figs. Exotic fruits, the potato, coffee, nuts, spices and plants from newly discovered lands all found their way back to Portugal by way of explorers in the fifteenth century. Although Portuguese food varies from region to region, most menus include fish and seafood. The national dish of Portugal is "bacalhau", dried, salted cod, which has been widely consumed ever since Portuguese sailors in the early sixteenth century salted and sun-dried the fish that they caught in order for it to last during the journey home. Grilled sardines and mackerel are popular in Portugal's coastal towns, with fish stews and a seafood rice dish known as 'arroz de marisco' also frequently prepared in the country's many seafood restaurants. Pork is the most popular meat, and is found in stews, soups and sausages. Typical desserts include rice pudding flavored with cinnamon, flan and caramel custard. Cheeses, usually made from sheep or goat's milk, are also used in desserts. Portugal is renowned for its pastries, the most famous outside of the country being 'pastel de nata', a small custard tart with cinnamon sprinkled on the top. 

 

Portugal has an impressive cultural heritage that dates back to prehistoric times, with elements including Celtic-influenced folklore in the north, its renowned Fado music (of Moorish influence), distinctive architecture and many distinguished writers. Fado involves melancholic songs about love, loss, woe and sadness being performed by one or two singers (depending on the region and city), accompanied by a 12-string Portuguese guitar and a six-string viola. Sometimes, however, the songs may also be humorous with political overtones. National icon Amalia Rodrigues, who died in 1999, made Fado famous beyond Portugal during the twentieth century by performing across Europe, as well as in Japan, South America and the USA. The architecture of Portugal ranges from prehistoric megaliths, Celtic hillside forts and Romanesque cathedrals (a style imported by monks who arrived from France) and magnificent Gothic monasteries constructed at the end of the thirteenth century, through to Baroque palaces and churches in the seventeenth century (often containing wood carvings gilded with Brazilian gold), sumptuous Art Nouveau cafes and shops built in the early twentieth century in major cities and innovative, post-modern and futuristic buildings designed since the mid-1970s. Houses are usually built of stone painted in bright colors. In the south of the country, they are often whitewashed, with door-frames and window-frames frequently painted yellow or blue.