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Live Dealer Casinos that offer live dealer games licensed from OMAN
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Oman is an Arab state with a coastline running along both the Arabian Sea to the southeast and the Gulf of Oman to the northeast of the country. It is bordered by the UEA to the northwest, Yemen to the southwest and Saudi Arabia to the west. Covering an area of almost 120,000 square miles (nearly 310,000 sq. km.), Kuwait has a population of approximately 2.78 million people.

 

Oman's geography is characterized by desert, with a gravel desert plain covering most of the center of the country. The country, which includes 2,000 miles (3,200 kilometers) of coastline, also features mountainous areas around the north (Al Hajar Mountains) and southeast coast. In recent years, Oman's tourism industry has been developed significantly, with its beaches, caves and mountains, as well as 'wadis' (lush, green areas of palm trees, flowers and grasslands, all attracting visitors from around the world. Several parts of Oman also contain historical forts, towers and castles, used over the years as lookout points to defend Oman's coastline from invasion. While several Western-style shopping malls have emerged in the capital Muscat in recent years, 'souqs' are still abundant in towns through much of the country, selling gold and silver jewelry, ornaments, spices and household goods.

 

The interior of Oman is hot and dry, while a humid climate prevails along the coastline. With less than 1% of Oman's terrain cultivated (limes, grains and dates constitute its key produce), the country relies on fruit and vegetable imports.

 

Arabic is Oman's official language, with people speaking various dialects, in addition to Balochi (a language spoken around the Pakistani-Iranian border), Southern Arabian dialects and a number of Semitic languages. As a result of historical relations between Oman and Zanzibar, Swahili and English are also widespread, with English adopted as Oman's second language in school. ) is widely understood and often used for business. 

 

Oman is the world's 31st richest economy by GDP (nominal) per capita and contains the world's 24th largest proven petroleum reserves (around 5.5 billion barrels). Oman has been exporting oil since 1967 but with a question mark over Oman's limited oil reserves and since a crash in oil prices in 1998, Oman has been looking to diversify its economy, embracing the tourism sector in particular. Thanks to its mineral resources (including zinc, silicon, copper, gold and iron), several industries have developed around them, with both the Omani economy (including GDP) and the country's employment situation receiving a boost as a result. Within the IT and telecoms sectors, Omani companies have also entered into fruitful partnerships with German and Japanese companies 

Key exports include oil and petroleum, precious stones, fish and shellfish, plastics, iron and steel products, and fertilizers. 

 

Rice is the main ingredient of Omani cuisine, served mainly with chicken, fish and mutton. Traditional Omani dishes include 'maqbous', a rice dish colored with saffron and cooked over spiced meats. Popular festival meals served during celebrations and holidays are 'aursia' (mashed rice seasoned with spices) and 'shuwa' (slow-cooked meat flavored with herbs and spices. Typical breads include 'rukhal' bread, a thin bread made from palm leaves that is traditionally baked over a fire and eaten in particular at breakfast with honey or at dinner with curry. Yogurt drinks are extremely popular, often flavored with pistachios or cardamom. Omani coffee, 'kawha', part of Oman's culture, is flavored with cardamom and often served with sweet offerings such as dates or 'halwa'.

 

Oman's culture lies in Islamic culture, reflected in its customs, art, music, architecture and traditional costume. Traditional folk music and traditional dances dominate festivals and celebrations, with several musician dance competitions being held annually. Oman is famous for its purebred Arab horses, as well as 'khanjar' knives, the curved daggers worn as part of ceremonial dress during holidays.