Live casinos that are available for residents of MALTA

Malta has four casinos, the largest and newest casino being the Portomaso Casino, located in the Portomaso Complex at St. Julians. Open from Monday to Thursday and on Sunday from 10 a.m. until 5 a.m., and on Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. until 6 a.m. The casino contains several slot machines, 14 game tables and a poker room (open daily from 7 p.m.), as well as luxury restaurant facilities and a lounge area.

Live Dealer Casinos that offer live dealer games licensed from MALTA
BONUSES
REVIEWS
Lucky Live Casino
Lucky Live Casino
100% up to €100 on First Deposit
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Celtic Casino
Celtic Casino
50% Cash Back up to €100
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Dublin Bet
Dublin Bet
100% up to €200 on first deposit
FULL REVIEW
Fairway Casino
Fairway Casino
First Deposit Bonus of 100% up to €200
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1 Live Casino
1 Live Casino
50% Cash Back up to €100
FULL REVIEW
Smart Live Casino
Smart Live Casino
150% up to £300 on First Deposit
FULL REVIEW
Castle Casino
Castle Casino
Get £ 100 on your First Deposit!
FULL REVIEW
Paddy Power Casino
Paddy Power Casino
£/€25 New Player Bonus
FULL REVIEW
Globet Casino
Globet Casino
Get 100% up to €500 on your first deposit.
FULL REVIEW

Malta, officially known as the Republic of Malta, is a country of Southern Europe consisting of an archipelago of islands located in the center of the Mediterranean. Malta is situated north of Libya, south of Sicily and east of Tunisia. Covering a total area of just over 120 square miles (316 sq. km.) and with a total population of just over 450,000 people (368,250 on the main island), Malta is the world's seventh most densely populated country. The island's ethnic make-up is Maltese 95.3%, British 1.6% and other nationalities 3.1%. Only the three largest islands - Malta, Gozo and Comino – are inhabited. The capital of Malta is Valletta, while the largest city is Birkirkara. Malta, which became independent from the United Kingdom in 1964 and became a republic in 1974, has been part of the Eurozone since 2008.

 

Malta is mostly low and rocky, and contains several coastal cliffs, as well as a main island coastline of over 60 miles (almost 100 kilometers). Malta has a Mediterranean climate, characterized by hot, dry summers and mild, rainy winters.

 

Malta has two official languages: Maltese, a Semitic language descended from what was Sicilian-Arabic, and English. Malta was involved in the Byzantine-Arab Wars, and was pillaged by Arab invaders, which destroyed much of its structures and left it virtually uninhabited until recolonized by the Arabs from Sicily around 1048 AD. The "Siculo-Arabic" language spoken by the Sicilian Arabs was adopted and eventually evolved into Maltese. 

Business correspondence is generally written in English.

 

Malta, the world's 36th richest economy by GDP (nominal) per capita, has an advanced economy that relies on tourism, foreign trade (acting as a freight transshipment point) and the manufacturing sector, as well as banking and finance. Malta is particularly attractive to foreign investors and trade partners, thanks to its abundant limestone, geographical location and productive labor force. The movie industry has also invested in Malta in recent years, with several big-budget foreign movie shot in the island every year. The country has increased the exports of many other types of services such as banking and finance. Malta exports a very wide range of goods, including sophisticated industrial equipment, electronic and electrical equipment, cosmetics and toiletries, paper and stationery products, plastic and metal products, building materials, and footwear and apparel. 

 

The food of Malta, an eclectic mix of Mediterranean and North African elements, is rustic in nature and reflects the foreign invasions that marked its history over several centuries. Malta has an abundance of fish, including bass, red mullet, stone fish, swordfish and tuna. Fish soups and stews are very popular, with octopus and squid also included in rich stews and pasta sauces.

Typical Maltese dishes include 'lampuki pie' (fish pie), rabbit stew and 'kapunata' (Malta's own version of ratatouille). As is often seen in other nearby areas of the Mediterranean, bread is often dipped in olive oil and seasoned as an appetizer or snack. 'Hobz biz-zejt', the Maltese version, is bread dipped in oil, rubbed with tomatoes and filled tuna, garlic, onion, tomatoes and capers.

Desserts include 'kannoli' (tubes of crispy, fried pastry filled with ricotta cheese), Sicilian-style 'semi freddo' desserts made of sponge cake, ice-cream, candied fruits and cream, and 'Helwa tat-Tork (a sweet mixture of sugar and crushed almonds). Malta also produces its own wines, which include several classic grape varieties. 

 

Malta's history and cultural heritage go back over 7,000 years, with the Phoenicians, Carthaginians, the Romans, Byzantines and Arabs, and more recently the French and English, all having left their legacy, which is reflected in the Malta's art and architecture. Several old structures are used for modern purposes, with the 16th century Grandmasters' Palace now used for parliament and the "Sacra Infermeria" now a modern-day conference center. Contemporary art is exhibited in the St. James Centre for Creativity, which was once a fortification. The Rococo-style National Museum of Fine Arts houses several works of art spanning several periods from the early Renaissance to modern times. Malta also contains a number of theaters and open-air venues that host music events, operas and plays.