Live casinos that are available for residents of IRELAND

Live Dealer Casinos that offer live dealer games licensed from IRELAND
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Lucky Live Casino
Lucky Live Casino
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Celtic Casino
Celtic Casino
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Dublin Bet
Dublin Bet
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Fairway Casino
Fairway Casino
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1 Live Casino
1 Live Casino
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Smart Live Casino
Smart Live Casino
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Castle Casino
Castle Casino
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Paddy Power Casino
Paddy Power Casino
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Globet Casino
Globet Casino
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Ireland, a member of the European Union since 1973, is an island with the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, the Celtic Sea to the south and the Irish Sea to the East. The entire island covers an area of almost 33,000 square miles (84,421 sq. km), with the Republic of Ireland accounting for just 80% of the island and Northern Island (part of the United Kingdom) accounting for the rest. With a population of just over 4.5 million, it is the world's 119th most populated country.

While Ireland, whose capital city is Dublin, is renowned for its lush green landscapes - it's not known as the "Emerald Isle" for nothing – it also has over 900 miles (1,440 km) of scenic coastline, spectacular lunar landscapes, maze-like caves, vibrant cities of culture, and picturesque towns and villages. The Giant's Causeway (A UNESCO World Heritage Site), a stunning collection of stones running from the cliffs down to the sea, was caused by volcanic activity, although according to legend, the giant Finn MacCool created it as a pathway to Scotland, which was inhabited by a rival giant. Ireland is indeed a country steeped in legends and myths, with stories of warriors, saints, fairies and leprechauns, and Celtic myths all at the heart of Irish culture. The shamrock, a kind of three-leaf clover, has been used as the country's symbol since the 18th century. The shamrock is also used as an emblem for several Irish sports teams and business organizations. It is also used outside Ireland by various organizations with a connection to the island, such as US basketball team the Boston Celtics, whose logo includes the shamrock.

Irish is the country's national language, although English dominates, with much printed media published only in English. Several TV and radio stations broadcast, however, in the Irish language and most road signs are in both Irish and English.

Although agriculture represents almost two-thirds of the country's land, since the 1980s, the economy has undergone significant transformation to become a center of high-tech industries par excellence, with several US corporations such as Apple, eBay, Microsoft, Google and Intel investing heavily there. Investments from other multinational s including Cadbury-Schweppes and Pfizer have also helped boost Ireland's exports profile in recent years. Typical Irish exports include machinery and equipment, computers, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, live animals and animal products.

St. Patrick's Day, celebrated on March 17th, used to be an Irish holy day, but today it is known for celebrating all things Irish across the world. It was only in the last century that Ireland started to host a St. Patrick's Day Parade: New York actually hosted the first parade in 1762, when Irish immigrants marched through the city to Manhattan's St Patrick's Cathedral. In fact, St. Patrick - Ireland's patron saint credited with introducing Christianity to the country - was not Irish at all. He was captured and brought from Britain to Ireland by Irish raiders. He later escaped and returned to Britain, but had a vision in which god told him to return to Ireland as a missionary.
These days, St. Patrick's Day is as good a time as any to enjoy Ireland's most famous beverages: Guinness (a dark stout brewed from Irish-grown barley and hops) and Irish whiskey.

Irish food traditionally revolved around meat and dairy products, with the potato being introduced to Ireland in the 16th centry to form an important stable in the country's diet. Typical traditional dishes include bacon and cabbage, and colcannon (greens with mashed potato).

Ireland, boasting several prolific writers, musicians and artists through the centuries, has a rich cultural heritage. In modern times, the city of Cork was the 2005 European Capital of Culture.
Within the world of literature, "Gulliver's Travels" by Jonathan Swift was published in 1726, while the 19th century saw the publication of Bram Stoker's "Dracula" (1897). Early 20th century classics include "Ulysses" by James Joyce (1922), who was also renowned for his collection of short stories, "Dubliners" (1914). Other famous writers include the flamboyant Oscar Wilde and the 18th century playwright Oliver Goldsmith. Contemporary novelists of note include Edna O'Brien, Maeve Binchy and Roddy Doyle. Traditional folk music and Irish dancing are a key element within the country's culture. Irish traditional music has influenced a number of modern music genres ,while Ireland has also produced many international artists such as U2, Thin Lizzy and the Cranberries.

Famous Irish people include the actors Peter O'Toole (probably best known for "Lawrence of Arabia"), Colin Farrell ("Minority Report", "Phone Booth" and "In Bruges"), Pierce Brosnan (best known for playing James Bond) and Daniel Day-Lewis ("My Left Foot", "In the Name of the Father", "The Boxer and "Gangs of New York"), who although born and raised in London, has British and Irish citizenship. Famous Irish musicians include U2 frontman Bono, Van Morrison and Shane MacGowan of The Pogues (Anglo-Irish, born in England). Dame Ninette de Valois, a highly influential classically ballet dancer, teacher and choreographer, was British but born in Ireland.