Live casinos that are available for residents of ICELAND

Live Dealer Casinos that offer live dealer games licensed from ICELAND
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1 Live Casino
1 Live Casino
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Paddy Power Casino
Paddy Power Casino
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Globet Casino
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Iceland, an island of Nordic Europe located just outside the Arctic circle and in the North Atlantic Ocean, covers an area of just under 40,000 square miles (around 103,000 sq. km.) and has a population of approximately 320,000 people, making it a country of very low population density, with 7.5 people per square mile (3.1 people per square kilometer), making it Europe's most sparsely populated. The capital of Iceland is Reykjavík, which is also the country's largest city.

 

The geography of Iceland is characterized by volcanoes, many of which are still active, mountains, glaciers and sand fields. Iceland has a temperate climate and although it is near to the Arctic, its coastline remains free of ice during the winter months.

 

The official language of Iceland is Icelandic, a Germanic language descended from Old Norse.

 

Iceland, which is one of the world's wealthiest and most developed countries and is the world's 21st richest economy by GDP (nominal) per capita, operates a free market economy. It has lower taxes than several other OECD countries. The Icelandic banking system collapsed in 2008, which led to a crisis that the country has yet to recover from. Iceland, the world's 12th largest fishing nation, relies heavily on the living marine resources in its waters, with marine products (fish and seafood, for example) accounting for more than 42% of the country's foreign currency earnings and fishing and fish processing accounting for around 10% of its GDP. Principal exports include fish and seafood, spring water and other beverages, optical and medical instrument, and iron and steel products.

 

Iceland's cuisine is based largely on animal products such as fish (due to geographical location), lamb and dairy. Popular foods sourced locally include smoked lamb, salmon and trout, wild mushrooms, Iceland moss and seaweed. As in many other Nordic countries, a buffet-style dinner is extremely popular, with Iceland celebrating its midwinter festival with a buffet known as 'Þorramatur', which includes various cured meats as well as fish and rye bread. Typical Icelandic desserts include mandarin cheesecake, blueberry tart, stewed rhubarb and 'skyr' (curds). On the first Monday of Lent, known as 'Bolludagur' (Bun Day), Icelanders eat meatballs or fishballs for dinner, rounded off with sweet buns for dessert.

 

Iceland's culture has its foundations in its Norse heritage and is famed for its traditional cooking and literature (poetry, as well as world-renowned medieval sagas set in the age of settlement), especially that from the 12th century to 14th century. The capital Reykjavik is a vibrant city of culture with its own symphony orchestra, and houses several art galleries, theaters, museums, movie theaters and bookstores. Contemporary Icelandic music ranges from folk and traditional medieval to pop, with Sigur Rós, a rock band that incorporates elements of classical and minimalist music into its work, and Björk, a singer-songwriter who has explored areas of rock, jazz, classical, folk and electronic dance music, being internationally known exponents of modern music from Iceland.