Live casinos THAT SPEAK Chinese Simplified

Live Casinos that Speak in Chinese Simplified :

BRANDS
REVIEWS
Lucky Live Casino
Lucky Live Casino
100% up to €100 on First Deposit
READ FULL REVIEW
CanBet Casino
CanBet Casino
100% up to €100 on First Deposit
READ FULL REVIEW
William Hill Casino
William Hill Casino
Get €300 for Free at William Hill Live Casino
READ FULL REVIEW
Golden Palace
Golden Palace
20% Sign Up Bonus
READ FULL REVIEW
888 Live Casino
888 Live Casino
Get welcome bonus of up to £800 or $1,400 on your first deposit! 
READ FULL REVIEW
Bet365
Bet365

First Deposit Bonus 100% up to $200

READ FULL REVIEW
Euro Grand Casino
Euro Grand Casino

€1000 Welcome Bonus

READ FULL REVIEW
24h Casino
24h Casino
100% First Deposit Bonus + 10 free spin. 
READ FULL REVIEW
Circus Casino
Circus Casino
Up to €1000 in Bonuses
READ FULL REVIEW
Simplified Chinese

Simplified character forms were created by simplifying the forms of a sizable proportion of traditional Chinese characters and decreasing the number of strokes. Some characters were simplified by applying regular rules and some were simplified irregularly. Some traditional characters are very unpredictable and dissimilar from simplified characters. Finally, many characters are matching between the traditional and simplified Chinese orthographies because they were left untouched despite simplification.

The first round of official character simplifications was issued in two documents by the People's Republic of China. After its first round issue, there was still confusion about simplified characters. The second- round of simplifications was poorly received due to the death of Chen Mengja, an intellectual of that era. The Chinese government released a major revision list in 2009 which included 8300 characters. Six characters previously listed as "traditional" characters were simplified, as well as 51 other "variant" characters were restored to the standard list.

Usage –Region wise

The simplified characters are in use in the People's Republic of China, Singapore and Malaysia. As China opens to the world, they appear in printed text produced in Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, and overseas Chinese communities. The National Common Language, Chinese is used for purposes such as ceremonies, cultural purposes, decoration, publications and books on ancient literature and poetry, and research purposes. Traditional Chinese remains on buildings predating the promotion of simplified characters, such as former government buildings, religious buildings, educational institutions, and historical monuments. However simplified Chinese character versions of publications is becoming popular, because cheaper editions on these mainland.

About 2,000 Traditional Chinese characters have been simplified following numerous different ways. Here are few simplified characters and the basis on which they have been simplified. The simplified characters are marked in red.

1. Simplification on the basis of frequently used abbreviations:

2. Retaining just one part from the traditional counterpart:

3. By replacing the phonetic element with a simpler one that is pronounced in the same or in a similar way:

4. In some cases, several traditional characters can be represented by one simplified character:

The 'alphabet' system of Mandarin Chinese is called PinYin. There are 21 'consonants' and 16 main 'vowels and diphthongs' are in it. Chinese is particularly a tonal language, and each character is pronounced differently and each tone implies a different meaning. One character can be pronounced several ways and interestingly, a character pronounced in the same manner may have diverse meanings.

 

There are several methods in which characters were simplified:

1. Replacing complicated components of common characters with simpler shapes:

o 對 → 对; 觀 → 观; 風 → 风; etc.

2. Changing the phonetic:

o 潔 → 洁; 鄰 → 邻; 極 → 极; etc.

3. Omitting entire components:

o 廣 → 广; 寧 → 宁; 滅 → 灭; etc.

4. Using printed forms of cursive shapes (simplified Chinese: 草书楷化; traditional Chinese: pinyin: cǎoshūkǎihuà):

o 書 → 书; 長 → 长; 馬 → 马; etc.

5. Adopting ancient forms that are simpler in form:

o 涙 → 泪; 網 → 网; 傑 → 杰; etc.

6. Creating new radical-radical compounds:

o 體 → 体; 塵 → 尘; 竃 → 灶; etc.

7. Creating new radical-phonetic compounds:

o 護 → 护; 驚 → 惊; 膚 → 肤; etc.

8. Merging a character into another one that sounds the same or similar:

o 餘 → 余; 穀 → 谷; 後 → 后; etc.

9. Merging several characters into a newly created and simpler character:

o 髮 & 發 → 发; 儘 & 盡 → 尽; 曆 & 歷 → 历; etc.

10. Systematically simplifying character components, so that all characters that use a given component are simplified in the same way:

o 門 → 门; 閉 → 闭; 問 → 问; etc.

o 馬 → 马; 騎 → 骑; 駕 → 驾; etc.

o 鳥 → 鸟; 鴨 → 鸭; 鴕 → 鸵; etc.

 

Chinese Tones

In the PinYin system of Chinese language, a tone is written as a superscript after the syllable or shown as a marking over the first vowel coming after a consonant. One can pronounce a consonant with a mid-tone and doesn't have any tonal changes. Below is the list of Chinese tones.

Tone 1 (mid-tone): There is no marking at all for the first tone or the mid-tone. It's a word with a regular tone.

Tone 2 (high-tone): The second tone is the high-tone, as it is higher than the mid-tone. For example, while pronouncing the vowel, a higher musical note can be used compared to the mid-tone.

Tone 3 (rising tone): The third tone is the rising tone that has two steps. To pronounce in this tone, one needs to bring down the tone of the voice from the mid- tone and then should slowly raise it to a very high tone.

Tone 4 (falling tone): The fourth tone is the falling tone and as it literally implies, it falls. It's like saying something with a very heavy tone that is falling down.

Tone 5 (abrupt glottal stop): The fifth tone, shorter than the falling tone, follows the same principle as the fourth tone. But a word is generally pronounced half-time shorter than one is pronounced with a falling tone.

Global impact of Chinese language

In today's worldwide marketplace, Chinese language is achieving higher visibility in the business world. The interest of learning Chinese is also very intense among the casual travelers, visiting the Orient. The need to develop trade relationships with China and other oriental countries, many companies are bound to hire Chinese knowing people for their technical and business communication needs. Learning one of the world's most commonly spoken languages, Chinese will open the doors of exciting career and business opportunities.